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Digital Citizenship

Cyberbullying

A 2011 Pew Internet study reports that 88% of media-using teens have witnessed other people be mean or cruel on social network sites.  19% of teens, almost one in five, have been bullied in the past year in some form (in person, online, by text, or by phone)1. A 2014 Pew study reports that 73% of adult internet users have seen someone be harassed in some way online2. The open nature of the internet allows people to target others easily and without the same repercussions that would exist in face-to-face interactions.

Talking points for elementary students:

  • Cyberbullying is repeated sending or posting of harmful messages, images, or videos about someone else using the Internet, cell phones, or other types of technology.
  • If a student believes they are being cyberbullied, the best first step is to step away from the computer or put the cell phone down, then tell a trusted adult (parent, teacher, etc.) what is going on.
  • If they can, don’t delete anything the cyberbully sent. They may need this as proof of what is going on.
  • If they know someone is being cyberbullied, help the person by encouraging them to talk to an adult. Tell the person being bullied that they care about them and want to help. Do not spread rumors. Tell the cyberbully to stop.

Talking points for secondary students:

  • If you know someone is being cyberbullied, be an upstander- empathize with the target and stand up for them.
  • Say “sorry”!  If you’ve said something that hurts someone else, apologize.  It’s what you’d do face-to-face, right?
  • If you are a target of cyberbullying, ignore or block out the bully. Save the evidence of what they are saying.  Change your privacy settings on social media accounts (information below).  Tell trusted friends and adults.
  • Remember that what you say and do online or in texts is permanent. Teasing, harassing, threatening, and using hate language can lead to serious consequences.

Links and additional resources: Cyberbullying tips from ConnectSafely.org  

http://www.connectsafely.org/tips-to-help-stop-cyberbullying/?doing_wp_cron=1378400368.0648949146270751953125

Recommendations for law enforcement related to cyberbullying  

http://stopcyberbullying.org/lawenforcement/telling_the_difference.html

1 Lenhart, Amanda, et al. “Teens, Kindness and Cruelty on Social Network Sites: How American teens navigate the new world of ‘digital citizenship.’ Executive Summary.” Pew Internet and American Life Project.  n. pag. 2011.

       2 Pew Research Center, October 2014, “Online Harassment” Available at: http://www.pewinternet.org/2014/10/22/online-harassment/

A link to an article from The Atlantic about cyberbullying and the research being done to reduce it.

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2013/03/how-to-stop-bullies/309217/

https://www.facebook.com/communitystandards (Facebook’s community standards)  http://support.twitter.com/entries/18311# (Twitter’s rules) http://instagram.com/about/legal/terms/# (Instagram’s terms of service)

Common Sense Media has lessons and additional resources at  http://www.commonsensemedia.org/

Should you use or distribute any of the materials, be sure to provide a link back to their site.

Common Sense Media’s Family Tip Sheet for Cyberbullying (elementary)  http://www.commonsensemedia.org/sites/default/files/k-5-familytip-cyberbullying.pdf  https://www.commonsensemedia.org/sites/default/files/uploads/pdfs/k-5-familytip-  cyberbullying_esp.pdf  (Spanish)

Common Sense Media’s Family Tip Sheet for Cyberbullying (secondary)  http://www.commonsensemedia.org/sites/default/files/6-12-familytip-cyberbullying.pdf  https://www.commonsensemedia.org/sites/default/files/uploads/pdfs/6-12-familytip-cyberbullying_esp.pdf (Spanish)

Cyberbullying videos from Common Sense Media Cyberbullying advice:  http://www.commonsensemedia.org/video/advice/cyberbullying A cyberbullying prevention guide video:

https://www.commonsensemedia.org/videos/cyberbullying-prevention-guide-for-kids

TUSD’s Positive Behavior Support Matrix includes information specific to the cyberbullying and how to be respectful, responsible, and safe while using it.

TUSD’s Stop, Walk, and Talk initiative can be applied to cyberbullying as well.  Instead of walking away, students should get off the computer or device and report it to an adult.  http://www.turlock.k12.ca.us/antibullying

1 Lenhart, Amanda, et al. “Teens, Kindness and Cruelty on Social Network Sites: How American teens navigate the new world of ‘digital citizenship.’ Executive Summary.” Pew Internet and American Life Project.  n. pag. 2011.

      2 Pew Research Center, October 2014, “Online Harassment” Available at: http://www.pewinternet.org/2014/10/22/online-harassment/

 

Digital Citizenship Resources for Parents

The following resources for cyber-safety and awareness are from Common Sense Media, a non-profit organization that is dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology.  TUSD is using many of their materials and resources to support digital citizenship.  You can access their website at http://www.commonsensemedia.org/.

Parent Tip Sheets:

 

Videos for Parents:

Digital Security

Talking points for elementary students:

  • Just like in “real life,” never interact with people on the internet that you don’t know.
  • When on the internet, never give out private information.  If asked for it, talk to a parent, teacher, or other trusted adult. Private information includes full name, age, address, telephone number, email addresses of family members, school and after school information, and parent work information.
  • Usernames and passwords should not have personal information. See links and resources below for information for creating usernames and effective passwords.
  • Students with email accounts need to be aware of spam. Spam is unwanted email that the person receiving it did not ask for. Spam has different forms, but will always try to get the recipient to provide private information.
  • Emails that are too good to be true are often spam. For example, an email from someone the student doesn’t know claiming they won a prize and just need to enter private information to claim it is spam.

Talking points for secondary students:

  • Online scams can lead to identify theft.  Identity theft can ruin young peoples’ financial futures and make it difficult to get loans (like student loans for college). Never give private information out unless it’s to a trusted source. Private information for older students to consider includes driver’s license number, city of birth, account numbers, passwords, and social security number.
  • Begin reading and learning about website privacy terms. Websites are required to post privacy policies, and young adults should read over the policies for the websites and social media platforms they use often, such as Facebook and Twitter.
  • Commercial websites often use “cookies” to track information about people who visit the site.  Cookies are small computer files placed in computers by the website.  Some sites will use the information gathered from the cookies to sell to other companies and agencies.  Many websites give options to users about what they do with the information they collect.  If the website does not, students should consider not going back to the website.
  • Make sure you have up-to-date antivirus software on computers.
  • Be careful about downloading free music, games, and software. These could very easily contain viruses and programs to steal information from your computer.

Links and additional resources:

Tips for strong passwords:

  • Have a different password for each site that requires it.   If you only have one common password, then someone could access all of your accounts if they get it.

1Griffith, Eric. "Password Protection: How to Create Strong Passwords." PC Mag. N.p., 29 Nov 2011. Web. 30 Sep 2013.

<http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2368484,00.asp>.

  • Change passwords often (every few months).
  • Do not leave them out for others to see, and do not share them.
  • Avoid common information/words in passwords.  In order to be strong, passwords should be unique and not linked to personal information that a hacker could easily identify.
  • Strong passwords have a mix of numbers, upper and lowercase letters, and special characters.  They should be at least 8 characters long and as random as possible.
  • Other password tips: spell a word backwards; substitute numbers or characters for letters (3 for e, ! for l, etc.); randomly capitalize letters; include special characters.
  • There are online password generators that will create passwords, as well as test the strength of passwords you’ve created.
  • For staff: no passwords on Post-It notes
  • For staff: no password lists on desks

Top 25 worst passwords of 2013

http://splashdata.com/press/worstpasswords2013.htm

Stanford’s password policy

http://arstechnica.com/security/2014/04/stanfords-password-policy-shuns-one-size-fits-all-   security/

Social Media Website Information- Privacy policies: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/about/privacy/ Twitter:  https://twitter.com/privacy

Instagram: http://instagram.com/about/legal/privacy/# MySpace: https://myspace.com/pages/privacy Pinterest: http://about.pinterest.com/privacy/

Pheed: https://www.pheed.com/privacy

Common Sense Media has lessons and additional resources at http://www.commonsensemedia.org/

Should you use or distribute any of the materials, be sure to provide a link back to their site.

Common Sense Media’s Family Tip Sheet for Online Security (elementary)  http://www.commonsensemedia.org/sites/default/files/k-5-familytip-onlinesecurity.pdf  https://www.commonsensemedia.org/sites/default/files/uploads/pdfs/k-5-familytip-  onlinesecurity_esp.pdf  (Spanish)

Common Sense Media’s Family Tip Sheet for Online Security (secondary)  http://www.commonsensemedia.org/sites/default/files/6-12-familytip-onlinesecurity.pdf

https://www.commonsensemedia.org/sites/default/files/uploads/pdfs/6-12-familytip-  onlinesecurity_esp.pdf (Spanish)

Digital Security videos from Common Sense Media:

Online Targeting and Tracking Information:  http://www.commonsensemedia.org/videos/online-targeting-and-tracking-animation

1Griffith, Eric. "Password Protection: How to Create Strong Passwords." PC Mag. N.p., 29 Nov 2011. Web. 30 Sep 2013.

<http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2368484,00.asp>.